Mariachi Los Camperos



* Story and Editing by Gabriela Perez & Xueying Chang

“The Los Angeles-based Mariachi Los Camperos is considered by many to be the finest mariachi ensemble in the world. Undoubtedly, it has played a central role in the United States in raising both the artistic standards and the public perceptions of mariachi music, which is now recognized by UNESCO as a masterpiece of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.”

—The National Folk Festival

Los Angeles–based Mariachi Los Camperos’ abundant accolades, including multiple Grammy awards and nominations and highly praised performances on premier concert stages such as Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Walt Disney Concert Hall, and the Getty Center, can easily obscure the fact that its leaders come from humble roots, deep within a mariachi tradition shaped by family and community. The group’s founder, Nati Cano, was a third-generation mariachi musician from the small town of Ahuisculco in the west Mexican state of Jalisco. From 1961 to his death in 2014, he lived his dream, forging his own group from his artistic vision and determination. Over his musical career, he challenged the attitudes that, during his youth in Mexico, led formally trained musical peers to look down on his beloved rural and working-class music. In the United States, he worked against class and racial prejudice that relegated Mexicans and their music to second-class status. In the end, he succeeded both socially and artistically, as borne out by the group’s and his own many honors and performances in prestigious venues across the United States and Mexico. In the words of Jesús “Chuy” Guzmán, his disciple and successor as Camperos leader, “He wanted to have a mariachi that would have dignity, that would have heart, that would have soul, and he made Los Camperos.”